How To Browse Windows System Restore Points and Recover Selected Files

Microsoft Operating Systems are quite famous for hiding their system files from users whether it be the task of configuring host file or it be recovering files from the restore points. Today I’m going to explain how to recover some files from the restore points created by Windows System Restore instead of running the system restore and losing the settings for most of the updated software and drivers.

Basically this task can be done by using a simple utility called as System Restore Explorer and I really haven’t heard of any other way to do this. I used this application to restore some of the DLL files of one my drivers which was accidentally deleted by me.

System Restore Explorer basically based on .NET framework and lets you to access Shadow Copy Volume which is by default not accessible in Windows. All you have to do is download System Restore Explorer from the developer site at end of this post.

After downloading the application, install and run it. You’ll be presented with all the restore point that have been created overtime. Now you can either Mount or Delete the restore points giving you the ability to retrieve data and also freeing up the used space by unwanted restore points.

system restore explorer Window

To access a specific restore point click on it and click Mount, a window will pop-up in-front of you with all the important file which were present by the time of the creation of that specific restore point.

shadow copy volume

Supported Operating Systems: Windows Vista and 7

Download System Restore Explorer

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About the Author

Avi is a technical blogger who loves to write about games, tips and tricks, and software reviews. Apart from blogging he loves to play online games like Dota and Counter Strike. You can check out his blog for more tips and tricks and how to related articles TechyFuzz

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  1. Christo Chiramukhathu says:

    It would be a good program (if it works as you mentioned).

    But there’re certain limitations :

    1. It may not work in XP because it shows Windows 7 & Vista as supporting OS.
    2. If we want to restore complete system (not a file) does it give that option ?
    3. If we want to save the complete system restore status for future use, does it gives that option?

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